Fulton Farms Market in Fall

Fresh, Seasonal Produce

The Farm Market houses the retail side of Fulton Farms. Located in a barn over 100 years old that is an excellent example of constructions techniques from the 19th century, the Market features produce grown on the farm. Asparagus, rhubarb, lettuce, cabbage, cauliflower, strawberries, corn, green beans, peas, onions, zucchini, summer squash, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, broccoli, watermelon, cantaloupe, pumpkins, fall squash and raspberries are among the selections fresh from our fields.

And Other Down Home Favorites

In addition to our fresh produce, we also offer a wide selection of canned items including popular favorites like raspberry jam, strawberry jam, orange marmalade, apple butter and pickles to boysenberry jam, elderberry jam, pickled garlic, and pickled jalapeo peppers. There is also a wide selection of preserves with no added sugar in flavors like peach, pear, strawberry, loganberry, blueberry and raspberry. Hot, medium and mild salsas, marinades, grilling sauces and steak sauce join salad dressings and mustards in shopping carts.

We stock items that complement our fresh produce such as fried green tomato mix, cobbler mix or packets of premeasured seasonings for canning projects. We also have a wide selection of spices, seasonings and flavorings from Wildman’s. Our dairy cooler holds milk, cottage cheese, rolls of butter, sour cream, whipping cream, whipped cream, eggs, salad dressings, jerky and a selection of cheeses and cheese spreads. In the fall, apple cider pressed by local growers is a favorite drink.

A new addition to the Market is bottled soft drinks. We carry an assortment of old fashioned soda pop flavors including root beer and vanilla cream soda. The dairy cooler also offers lemonade, iced tea, and spring water. The hot summer sun makes these a favorite during July and August.

When you look up in the market you will notice two things: the old rafters and tractor seats. The tractor seats date back to the days when metal seats were the norm. Dating back to the 30′s and 40′s, they serve as most unusual, but highly appropriate, ornaments for the old barn.